Law Society of Scotland strategic partnership on cybersecurity

The Law Society of Scotland has agreed a new strategic partnership with Mitigo, a cybersecurity consultancy.  The partnership will provide targeted guidance, advice and resources for the legal sector, helping solicitors to keep their digital operations secure. As well as supporting CPD and training events and providing practical advice, Mitigo will offer security and resilience services directly to Law Society members.  This covers risk assessments, technology testing, training, governance and incident response.  They also provide a dedicated expert client helpline and sandbox to which suspicious content may be sent.

Paul Mosson, Executive Director of Member Services and Engagement at the Law Society of Scotland said: “Cybercrime is a major threat to all organisations regardless of size and law firms can be a particularly attractive target to criminals due to holding sensitive data, often in combination with the movement of large amounts of money. With most organisations currently working remotely, the need to have confidence in your cyber security has never been greater. The team at Mitigo has been working with firms in England and Wales since 2017 and has the technical expertise as well as extensive knowledge of the legal sector to help solicitors and their employees understand, anticipate and manage their risks.”

Lindsay Hill, CEO at Mitigo, said: “Law firms become victims of cybercrime when they confuse cybersecurity with their IT support. They are different things. We are seeing an alarming increase in attacks by criminal gangs involving ransomware and email account takeover. We are delighted to be working with the Law Society to help keep their members safe.”

See the Law Society’s full announcement.

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ABA and Hinshaw warn of cyber risks when remote working

The American Bar Associaton (ABA) have highlighted that when working remotely there are important considerations around privacy risks, relating to digital working that should be considered. Ruth Hill Bro, co-chair of the ABA Cybersecurity Legal Task Force, warns that “Law firms are attractive targets and the risk of cyber breaches multiplies as more employees work remotely. The outbreak also is creating opportunities for hackers and scammers. There are thousands of COVID-19 scam and malware sites being created daily,”

The ABA suggests that once the decision has been made to ask employees to work from home, “firms should first perform a risk assessment. All work should be done on secure servers, using multifactor authentication to gain access to information.” in order to protect confidential client data.

Hinshaw, has released a further report highlighting some risks and recommendations around using video conferencing software, including technical, encryption, and settings recommendations to help improve the safety of calls, as well as advice around video-conferencing and client confidentiality.

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